Combating Mobile Mistakes with Findologic

Combating Mobile Mistakes with Findologic

Combating Mobile Mistakes with Findologic

Mit dem Klick auf den Dienst werden auf Ihrem Endgerät Skripte geladen, personenbezogene Daten erfasst und Cookies gespeichert. Die Übermittlung erfolgt: in gemeinsamer Verantwortung an Google Ireland Limited. Zweck der Verarbeitung: Auslieferung von Inhalten, die von Dritten bereitgestellt werden, Auswahl von Online-Werbung auf anderen Plattformen, die mittels Real-Time-Bidding anhand des Nutzungsverhaltens automatisch ausgewählt werden und Übermittlung und Darstellung von Video-Inhalten. Datenschutzerklärung
PGlmcmFtZSB3aWR0aD0iNTYwIiBoZWlnaHQ9IjMxNSIgc3JjPSJodHRwczovL3d3dy55b3V0dWJlLmNvbS9lbWJlZC9HZlhETDdqaG0wayIgdGl0bGU9IllvdVR1YmUgdmlkZW8gcGxheWVyIiBmcmFtZWJvcmRlcj0iMCIgYWxsb3c9ImFjY2VsZXJvbWV0ZXI7IGF1dG9wbGF5OyBjbGlwYm9hcmQtd3JpdGU7IGVuY3J5cHRlZC1tZWRpYTsgZ3lyb3Njb3BlOyBwaWN0dXJlLWluLXBpY3R1cmUiIGFsbG93ZnVsbHNjcmVlbj48L2lmcmFtZT4=

Mobile commerce has become ubiquitous, but many retailers are failing to recognise that the flow state for mobile differs greatly from desktop. 

63% of people will abandon a product or website as a result of preventable usability issues, so by prioritising mobile and overcoming the challenges associated with limited screen real estate, retailers are able to create an intuitive path to conversion.

 For example, Search overlays should cover the entire screen. It is also best practice to keep the number of search suggestions deliberately limited. Users shouldn’t have to scroll to view suggestions and the interface should be simple to avoid cumbersome and fiddly navigation.

 The use of everpresent filters – small icons that remain visible on a user’s screen as they scroll allows shoppers to enhance their search at any time, without the all too familiar friction of having to scroll back up to the top. Meanwhile, off-canvas filters are collapsible and will be hidden when not in use to make use of screen space.

Through Findologic’s A.I. based shopping assistant, Li.S.A® we understand shopper behaviours and preferences, minimising touch points and relieving the burden associated with mobile, so that browsers can sit back and enjoy personalised results.

If we take a look at social giants such as Facebook or Instagram, touchpoints are identifiable instantly with central elements that have become almost instinctive in our everyday lives. Replicating this experience within m-commerce and minimising discrepancies between the channel’s users interact with every day, provides a more intrinsic experience.

With so much potential to capitalise on the current ecommerce boom, there is a requirement to become more mobile-centric in their strategies. Book a complimentary consultation with the FIndologic Team to understand how you can optimise for success.

 

Rachel King

Rachel is a Content Marketing Specialist, creating insightful materials on all things eCommerce, tech and Findologic that drive growth and awareness. Rachel has a wide understanding of the tech space, before joining Findologic, she produced content for global FinTech publications as well as working closely with industry leaders for a range of marketing initiatives.

“Alexa, get me up to speed with voice commerce”

“Alexa, get me up to speed with voice commerce”

“Alexa, get me up to speed with voice commerce”

By 2030 it is expected that voice-assisted commerce will account for 30% of overall ecommerce sales. Online stores have been slow to fully adopt voice commerce, and it is very much in its infancy. So far, the most prevalent progressions in voice commerce are features such as a voice search option on-site, rather than manually submitting a search, however there is scope for far more development in the coming years. 

 

What is voice-based ecommerce?

While voice recognition technology goes as far back as the 1960s, it wouldn’t be until 2011 and 2012 Siri would be available on iPhones, and Android would release their counterpart, respectively.   

Voice technology might not be necessarily a new invention, but consumers are increasingly adopting it and retailers are becoming more and more accommodating to this trend. It’s safe to bet that voice commerce will surge over the next five years.  

Voice commerce refers to using your voice to search for or purchase products online. All you need is to speak to your digital voice assistant.  

To understand voice commerce, let’s look at its foundation: voice recognition technology. 

Voice recognition technology allows devices to recognise your voice. It sounds simple, but it’s more complicated.

Voice recognition technology filters sounds into a readable format that it can translate. The technology then leverages inputs and algorithms to interpret what was said, and respond accordingly. As with many A.I. applications, it continually improves.  

Devices such as smartphones and smart speakers use voice recognition to interpret questions, commands, and more.  

Voice commerce does have some requirements in order to be truly frictionless:

It requires a device that has a voice assistant and allow it time to understand the user  and learn to interpret their speech.

It’s also necessary to set up payment information in the user’s digital wallet for quick buying.  

However, when everything is set up, voice commerce is truly effortless and presents many opportunities for businesses.  

“Okay Google – what’s the best-reviewed gaming laptop?”

“Hey Alexa – give me running shoes at a discount?” 

Voice commerce presents an infinite number of paths your shoppers can take. Customers don’t necessarily need to have a specific product in mind – just a problem they need a solution for, that they use voice command to get them from a to b. Voice commerce allows consumers to engage with a conversation with technology – and your business – to explore different products, services, and more. 

Pain points in ecommerce

Conversational commerce or chat commerce or conversational marketing is a way online retailers sell their products and services by conversation

How does voice commerce improve the shopping experience?

Customer experience is leading the ecommerce agenda, and convenience is at the heart of this. Consumers want fast, secure, and personalised shopping. Voice commerce offers all of these, and is becoming hot:

Convenience and Faster shopping journeys

Speaking is faster than typing. It only makes sense therefore that customers would use voice assistants where they can. It allows consumers to shop without having to put the rest of their life on pause. 

All in all, voice commerce provides a smoother and smarter buying journey.

Creating more personalised shopping experiences. 

Personalisation is everything to the consumer in today’s world of ecommerce. There’s no way of getting away from it.  Voice commerce presents a more personalised experience because by design they get to understand the shopper they’re talking to. The ability to save order histories, provide an easy path to reorder, and quick recommendations makes for a better experience all around.

Make your products easily discoverable

Voice commerce also expands the reach of your products. Google’s voice search feature means that if your products are listed on Google Shopping, any consumer using voice shopping will be able to find them.  This presents an excellent opportunity.

How can businesses take advantage of voice shopping?

Subscriptions and reordering

Reordering is one of the most common uses for voice commerce. The reason for this is that voice commerce already takes into account historical orders and provides a simple path for users to be able to reorder goods. Common examples include haircare products, supplements, food and beverage, and more.

Product recommendations

You can also use voice commerce for merchandising purposes. It gives you historical data and intel into your customer purchasing behavior, which allows you to push specific products that they will appreciate. 

Voice commerce platforms can begin to understand their consumers’ preferences like dietary restrictions, past purchases, and more to make relevant product recommendations during a voice search.

Looking beyond on-site voice functionality 

Slow product discovery is one of the top frustrations for ecommerce shoppers so there is vast potential to capitalise on voice commerce for its purchasing convenience, namely by ordering products directly through voice assistants rather than accessing the website first. The thing is, unlike Amazon, a majority of retailers do not have their own voice assistant platform or voice-enabled devices, so if merchants wish to spearhead the future of voice commerce and become truly voice accessible via the likes of Alexa or Google Assistant, they’ll have to enter into partnerships with these tech giants.

A few companies have already set a precedent. For example, Google and Walmart teamed up to offer Walmart’s customers voice-assisted grocery shopping. Walmart’s Voice Order feature works across all platforms that are powered by Google Assistant, including smartphones, smartwatches and Google’s smart speakers so that items can be ordered without even having to access the store.

What is the future of voice commerce?

Voice commerce might be somewhat new to the ecommerce space, but it’s growing rapidly, and expected reach a staggering $19.4 billion in 2023. If you haven’t already, it could be time to consider leveraging voice-activated shopping  for your ecommerce store. 

 

Considering new and historical barriers

These partnerships offer a huge opportunity to be one of the first to enter the voice-based market, and we are likely to see others follow suit as voice commerce evolves. However, it is likely that these partnerships will be somewhat restricted. Currently, these partnerships are exclusively in the United States, where demand for voice commerce is higher and there is a drive to progress with the technology. In fact, in the United States voice commerce is the fastest growing sales channel with the voice technology user base in the U.S. accounting for 42.7% of the population.

However it seems that in Europe, the European Union has already put a stake in the ground, with policies expected to follow in the coming years that might pose a barrier to uptake in the region.

The main concern is surrounding competition. Only a small number of major players control the voice assistance market, including Google, Amazon, Apple and Microsoft. Practices limit the possibility to use multiple voice assistants on a singular device (for example, Amazon’s Alexa will not utilise Apple’s Siri upon devices). This means that the owners of specific voice assistants have full control over user relationships, potentially impacting the discoverability and visibility of rival services.

It is also worth noting that uptake by customers may be slow. It is a lot harder for customers to trust the purchase of a product they can’t see, however there are ways voice assistants may be able to overcome this. Solutions that employ voice and visuals such as Amazon’s Echo Show provide a richer experience. That being said, connecting with shoppers on-site before purchase is likely to become a requisite for those retailers looking to cement sales.

In line with the lack of trust surrounding non-visual purchases, it is likely that we will see voice commerce most popular with repeat purchases – those that shoppers deem as low risk as they are confident with what they are spending their money on, for example groceries. In fact, based on analysis, the grocery product segment dominated in 2020, with more than 39% share. Despite shoppers looking for conveniences, those items that require a little more consideration and research are not likely to be purchased until a shopper has performed their due diligence.

Not all banks or financial institutions allow voice commerce purchases – largely down to the novelty of the technology. As well as this, there are concerns surrounding the reliability and safety of purchasing with voice commands. Furthermore, most voice commerce shoppers make low-value purchases.The seamlessness of voice commerce makes it seen as less secure – after all, passwords and verification methods aren’t generally used. 

There’s still a way to go. Conversational AI is still an emerging technology, meaning it’s not completely intuitive to a lot of people. Every person’s speaking voice is unique, and machines may struggle to understand accents, slang, and other nuances. Developers have to  continuously improve language features, to overcome this challenge.  

Getting the ball rolling

Regardless, voice commerce is more than just the act of purchasing. There are a number of ways retailers can begin optimising for voice commerce in the buildup to purchase, by enhancing discoverability – think SEO for voice. 

For example, optimising content to increase your chances of appearing in voice searches. This includes:

  • Answer ‘Who’, ‘What’, ‘Where’ and ‘How’ Questions
  • Optimise for long-tail queries
  • User conversational language
  • Account for regional dialects
  • Anticipate questions

Another consideration is to add new skills on Alexa and Google devices. Alexa has hundreds of thousands of skills that have an answer to almost every question users ask. Now, retailers are able to add value and improve CX by installing their own skills onto well known voice assistants to provide more context and answer questions specific to their business.

Showing their commitment to drive voice commerce and its adoption by smaller retailers, in February, Amazon made public a developer tool called Alexa Conversations, which uses deep learning to make conversations flow naturally: This should open the door to smaller retailers to develop skills, who have previously been reluctant due to resources as rather than pre-program Alexa with a whole host of possible commands or questions that customers might ask, Conversations is able to learn broad categories of conversation.

 

A tipping point

Major players in the voice commerce space have made moves in the last year to drive this growing way of shopping forward, with retailers strategizing in line with these. As these initiatives solidify, it is likely that other regions, besides the United States, will follow suit and make more significant steps that demonstrate commitment to voice commerce. Until then, it is important for retailers to look beyond the standard on-site voice functionality and familiarise themselves with the scope of possibilities available directly through voice assistants so that they can hit the ground running when the rest of the world catches up to The States’ level of adoption.

 

Rachel is a Content Marketing Specialist, creating insightful materials on all things eCommerce, tech and Findologic that drive growth and awareness. Rachel has a wide understanding of the tech space, before joining Findologic, she produced content for global FinTech publications as well as working closely with industry leaders on a range of marketing initiatives.

Open Source Elasticsearch Is Not so Open Anymore: Enter Findologic

Open Source Elasticsearch Is Not so Open Anymore: Enter Findologic

Marcel Krabath

Open Source Elasticsearch Is Not so Open Anymore: Enter Findologic

The conflict between AWS and Elasticsearch has come to a head, forcing many ecommerce businesses to rethink their offering – but what are the alternatives?

Over the years, Amazon has been criticised by the open source community for taking advantage of the freely available software and the launch of Amazon’s Elasticsearch Service, underpinned by the open source, Elasticsearch was no different. When AWS made the decision to use Elastic’s code on its cloud and profit from it as a managed service, Elastic’s CEO, Shay Banon responded, saying that “some cloud service providers have taken advantage of open source products by providing them as a service, without contributing back.“

Back in January 2021, Elasticsearch acted, changing its licence from the open-source Apache 2.0-license (ALv2) to the non-open-source friendly Server Side Public Licence (SSPL) in order to prevent what they call “big code robbery”. The new licensing states that users do not have the right to sell the software, meaning third parties can not sell the software for a fee or as a product or service.

This had a direct impact on AWS’s Elasticsearch offering, so it comes as no surprise that AWS announced the release of OpenSearch, a fork derived from versions 7.10.2 of Elasticsearch and Kibana and licensed under Elastic’s previous and permissive Apache 2.0 licence. In short, Amazon is able to continue to use the previous version of Elasticsearch, under the same offering and build upon this themselves to continuously enhance its abilities, although they will be unable to pull in future versions of Elasticsearch core code.

So, if you’re an Elasticsearch user you’ve probably asked yourself the question: should I continue using the software under the new licensing or look for an alternative?

Is Elasticsearch still a good choice?

The licence change of  Elasticsearch v2 will no doubt force many retailers to rethink their choice of software. Fundamentally, a majority of online stores will be looking to drive monetary growth with the assistance of Elasticsearch, however the new licence for Elasticsearch v2 has created an air of uncertainty and confusion surrounding the product and the repercussions that may ensue for commercial use.

Licensing aside, Elasticsearch is a complex system and requires extensive maintenance and configuration in order to tailor it to your specific needs. Even as a managed service, such as the one offered by AWS or or Elastic, there is still a high level of technical burden.

    Enter: Findologic

    If you’ve built your own online services on Elasticsearch, the SSPL license is most likely a risk your company will not want to take.

    You might consider AWS new OpenSearch offering as an alternative, however for a majority of retailers today, software is about easy to use solutions with minimal burden – as a bare search API, the retailer would have to integrate OpenSearch into their site manually and manage significant setup to tailor it to their specific needs. Even after this, developers still have to build UI features such as Shopping Guides, Autocomplete and Promotions.

    The closest and most trusted alternative to Elasticsearch within the open source community is Solr – it is a mature product with a broad user community and has no single company controlling contributions.

    Built upon the latest version of Solr, Findologic has created a platform that allows for comprehensive search and navigation optimisation, minus the technical burden. Rather than spending time, resources and money to create, maintain and develop a search solution underpinned by Solr, Findologic does all the hard work, with tried and tested, revenue boosting software including an AI layer without the risk of repercussions.

    By creating a powerful platform that looks beyond traditional search and navigation approaches, innovating every stage of a customer’s journey for usability, inspiration, guidance and personalisation, retailers are able to benefit from sophisticated technology, without the excruciating challenge of developing or maintaining the underlying technology themselves.

    So, if you’re after a quick win and want to leave the licensing headache and internal development battle in the past, the better choice today is another vendor altogether – one who has already done the leg work and created a ready to use platform that can be relied on.

    About Findologic

    Search and navigation are at the epicentre of any user’s path to purchase – Findologic has over 13 years of experience in this and is one of the world’s leading providers today. Bridging the gap between in-store and online retail experience is a requirement for any online retailer – Findologic’s comprehensive set of features supercharges customer journeys, optimising every element of a browser’s pathway to conversion for efficiency and intuitiveness.

    Satisfy your customers and increase revenue: harnessing the latest A.I. technologies, Findologic’s search and navigation platform is more intelligent than ever, drilling into user behaviours to personalise every journey and present users with gold-standard outputs that convert.

    Marcel Krabath

    Rachel is a Content Marketing Specialist, creating insightful materials on all things eCommerce, tech and Findologic that drive growth and awareness. Rachel has a wide understanding of the tech space, before joining Findologic, she produced content for global FinTech publications as well as working closely with industry leaders on a range of marketing initiatives.

    Findologic and BigCommerce announce strategic partnership to power online CX for retailers

    Findologic and BigCommerce announce strategic partnership to power online CX for retailers

    Findologic and BigCommerce announce strategic partnership to power online CX for retailers

    Findologic, a leading search and navigation platform, has announced its pan-European partnership with global ecommerce platform provider, BigCommerce.  The strategic alliance sees the two tech leaders join forces to offer retailers new and innovative ways to power online customer experiences that drive sales and build long-term customer loyalty.

    Findologic’s solution helps supercharge ecommerce conversions by allowing retailers to optimise every element of a shopper’s path to purchase – from enhanced on-site search and navigation to serving up hyper-personalised content that supports an individual customer’s buying journey, to UX optimisation, shopping guides and online merchandising. 

    Its Artificial Intelligence (AI) powered virtual shopping assistant, Li.S.A. –, uses intent signals and discovery to deliver improved on-site search.  Rather than relying on keywords alone, which can often return volumes of random results, Li.S.A. is able to analyse behaviours to understand each shopper’s intent, in order to deliver personalised recommendations that are more likely to convert.

    Marking the launch of the partnership, Findologic will release a plug-in that allows brands and retailers already using the BigCommerce platform to quickly and easily enhance on-site search and navigation.

    Using the newly developed app available on the BigCommerce platform, retailers can transform digital buying journeys using Findologic in as little as 5 weeks – from an initial scope of work, which includes a bespoke project plan, through to integration, testing and go-live.  Findologic’s user interface allows direct integration into retailers’ online store fronts, while its mobile-first technology ensures that User Experience (UX) is optimised and future-proofed, no matter what channel or device the customer chooses to shop on.

    Matthias Heimbeck, CEO of Findologic, commented: “By basing on-site search on intent and not keywords, we help retailers revolutionise the way shoppers are served results online, to enhance CX, drive conversions and revenues, all while reducing returns and improving customer lifetime value.  We’re excited to be working with BigCommerce to offer up these capabilities to its customers, so that they too can drive value across their business – and this is just the start of that journey.  

    “Looking ahead, we will be collaborating closely to offer up a combined technology roadmap that pushes the envelope on innovation and enables retailers to evolve and future-proof their ecommerce operations,” he added.

    Deepak Anand, Senior Director at BigCommerce, said: “As two businesses that put the enhancement of customer experience at the front and centre of what we do, this is a natural fit that we should come together and collaborate formally as partners.  With so much opportunity to grow the online channel, as we have seen demand for ecommerce accelerated and sustained since the start of the pandemic, our partnership will allow retailers and brands to optimise ecommerce shopping journeys to meet the ongoing needs of customers.”

    Rachel King

    Rachel is a Content Marketing Specialist, creating insightful materials on all things eCommerce, tech and Findologic that drive growth and awareness. Rachel has a wide understanding of the tech space, before joining Findologic, she produced content for global FinTech publications as well as working closely with industry leaders for a range of marketing initiatives.

    Video Dev News // May 2021

    Video Dev News // May 2021

    Video Dev News // May 2021

    Mit dem Klick auf den Dienst werden auf Ihrem Endgerät Skripte geladen, personenbezogene Daten erfasst und Cookies gespeichert. Die Übermittlung erfolgt: in gemeinsamer Verantwortung an Google Ireland Limited. Zweck der Verarbeitung: Auslieferung von Inhalten, die von Dritten bereitgestellt werden, Auswahl von Online-Werbung auf anderen Plattformen, die mittels Real-Time-Bidding anhand des Nutzungsverhaltens automatisch ausgewählt werden und Übermittlung und Darstellung von Video-Inhalten. Datenschutzerklärung
    PGlmcmFtZSB0aXRsZT0iRmluZG9sb2dpYyBEZXYgTmV3cyBNYWkgMjAyMSIgd2lkdGg9IjEwODAiIGhlaWdodD0iNjA4IiBzcmM9Imh0dHBzOi8vd3d3LnlvdXR1YmUuY29tL2VtYmVkLzlYNk1BM1AwLWUwP2ZlYXR1cmU9b2VtYmVkIiAgYWxsb3c9ImFjY2VsZXJvbWV0ZXI7IGF1dG9wbGF5OyBjbGlwYm9hcmQtd3JpdGU7IGVuY3J5cHRlZC1tZWRpYTsgZ3lyb3Njb3BlOyBwaWN0dXJlLWluLXBpY3R1cmU7IHdlYi1zaGFyZSIgcmVmZXJyZXJwb2xpY3k9InN0cmljdC1vcmlnaW4td2hlbi1jcm9zcy1vcmlnaW4iIGFsbG93ZnVsbHNjcmVlbj48L2lmcmFtZT4=
    Findologic Video Dev News // May 2021

    Findologic’s second development update of 2021 sees Principal Engineer, Georg Sort explain the latest innovations to our platform. Our development team are continually improving our technologies to ensure that Findologic clients have access to the best solutions on the market. 

    Our most recent developments include:

    00:20 Shopify Multilanguage
    01:15 BigCommerce App
    02:09 Turkisch, Romanian, Finnish, Korean
    03:20 Improved Assisted Suggest
    05:20 Express Guide Overlay

     

     

    Georg Sorst is CTO at FINDOLOGIC GmbH and was the first permanent employee of the company. He helped build both the team and the product from scratch. He gained his IT industry expertise and experience over many years with companies such as IBM as well as various start-ups. As a frequent guest and lecturer at conferences and events he ensures he remains technically up-to-date.  Georg is also a member of the Gesellschaft für Informatik.  What fascinates him about Findologic is the constant challenges posed by the e-commerce market, in particular search technologies with their rapid developments and trends.

    Preparing for a post-cookie future

    Preparing for a post-cookie future

    Preparing for a post-cookie future

    What is a third party cookie?

    A third party cookie is used for cross-site tracking, so that data can be harvested as you surf the web when the browser is not on the tracking website’s domain. Web browsers will store a cookie of what you have been interacting with across websites that advertisers, marketers and social media platforms can then utilise to tailor ads, content and recommendations to your preferences. Unknowingly, the browser creates a “trail of crumbs” including previous websites and searches that they have used prior to coming onto your site. 

    Why should I care about cookies?

    Third-party cookies have been a talking point with Digital Marketers for years now, but recently it was confirmed that the love affair with third-party cookies would be coming to an  end. Google was always going to begin the rollback of third-party cookies in February 2020, however Google accelerated plans last month, by announcing that they won’t be building “alternative identifiers to track individuals as they browse across the web, nor will we use them in our products”.

    With nearly 65% of browser users going through Chrome, Google’s decision not to have a significant replacement to the third-party cookie should be a topic on any marketer’s agenda, as it will have a direct impact on strategies and the way in which we harvest data. Firefox and Safari have already phased out third-party cookies, so Google’s announcement reinforces that third-party cookies will soon be a thing of the past. 

    The removal of third-party cookies means that websites can no longer harvest or utilise browser data if the individual is searching outside their own domain. As a result, activities such as personalisation will become difficult if you rely on third-party data to provide these 1:1 experiences. Since companies will no longer have access to such a large pool of data, marketing strategies will need to be rethought. Beginning the transition towards first-party data now is imperative, so that organisations can determine how and what to do with their new data pools and where there may be gaps that need filling and therefore require additional on-site resources.

    What can I do to ensure that experience doesn’t suffer due to limited data?

    What can be done to replace the insights on prospects that we are losing, without worrying about invading the privacy of users?

    Firstly, all marketers should remember that first-party data is key. Ensuring that you have a process in place to create actionable insights based on first-party data tracked on your website (such as page clicks, previous orders and newsletter sign ups), can allow you to utilise similar insights as you would off-site.

    Retailers must assess their internal capabilities and resources. Yes, some large organisations may have the scope to develop technology internally that addresses these newfound challenges, however a vast majority of the time (especially given the relatively time-sensitive nature of the activity) retailers will be better off partnering with a third party vendor. Navigating this new territory will be difficult for many – adapting strategies and managing the transition phase will likely result in a dip in the overall performance and quality of outputs. A more sensible approach for most would be to consider working with a tech-partner. The tech ecosystem has become increasingly fragmented in recent years, meaning that there is no shortage of niche providers who are experts in a very specific area and can resolve complex issues that in-house expertise often cannot. Tackling the cookie challenge by harvesting first-party data and deriving valuable, personalised insights from this in real time is one of them – taking into account previously viewed items, past purchases and top search results from users to deliver 1:1 journeys and results, without invading their day-to-day browsing of the web.

    A noteworthy tip for a post-cookie world would be for retailers to encourage customers to create an account allowing organisations to access a larger, historical pool of data on an individual basis. Commonly, we see retailers implementing pop-ups that offer customers a discount if they sign up, however with companies no longer able to rely on a vast pool of data, incremental changes such as this can ensure valuable data is harvested that reinforces customer loyalty.

    Getting the ball rolling

    The removal of third-party cookies from your website is going to change how ecommerce professionals handle website personalisation and user experience. Retailers need to ensure that they are well prepared so that the cookie phase out will not impact their on-site CX . Since browsers these days are so used to instant gratification, retailers will need to ensure not only that their pool of first-party data is vast and actionable, but that they are able to make sense of this data in a way that adds value in real-time. These kinds of experiences, personalising not only results but journeys, ensure optimisation for on-site efficiency and intuitiveness, so that your transition towards cookie-free operations is seamless.

    Sam Jackson

    Sam’s current and previous role in the technology space has allowed him to liaise with hundreds of retailers, across a diverse range of industries, helping them monetise their on-site offing and drive conversion. These connections have enabled Sam to generate a thorough understanding of on-site pain points and armed him with the knowledge to provide support and guidance to retailers of all sizes.

    Findologic joins forces with Nosto 🚀
    This is default text for notification bar
    Datenschutzinformation
    Der datenschutzrechtliche Verantwortliche (Findologic GmbH, Österreich) würde gerne mit folgenden Diensten Ihre personenbezogenen Daten verarbeiten. Zur Personalisierung können Technologien wie Cookies, LocalStorage usw. verwendet werden. Dies ist für die Nutzung der Website nicht notwendig, ermöglicht aber eine noch engere Interaktion mit Ihnen. Falls gewünscht, treffen Sie bitte eine Auswahl: